Put an end to buckling knees


Put an end to buckling knees

What to do to stop your knees buckling

When the knees start to buckle it can be for many reasons. Here we will look at buckling knees as a symptom of trigger points.

What are trigger points?

Trigger points are discrete, focal, hyper-irritable spots located in a taut band of skeletal muscle.  They produce pain locally and in a referred pattern and often accompany chronic musculoskeletal disorders.

For more information on this, you can check out my other blog on "Foam rolling and trigger point release"

https://samuelplove.com/blog/k...

The muscle group that we are going to focus on is the quadriceps (on the front of the thigh) - more specifically the vastus medialis and the vastus lateralis

    The vastus medialis

    Vastus medialis is found on the inner side of the top of the thigh. if it goes too far inwards it would lead you to the adductors (refer to picture for example).

    The vastus medialis is responsible, along with the rest of the quadricep group, for straightening the knee.  This muscle from the quadriceps has been found to be important to the reduction of lower limb injuries. If it is weak or has an abundance of knots, it wont be able to function correctly, leading to increased risk of injury and poor walking mechanics.

    The “X” on the picture above, marks where the knots are and the red area is the possible referral pain. Bear in mind that the points shown are not an exact area of trigger points and trigger point areas can vary, which is why it is best to do your own feel of the muscle before you begin. The indicator of a trigger point is a deep dull pain.

    Causes of trigger points arrival: hamstring weakness or injury, ports overload without proper technique, poor foot and ankle biomechanics.

    Other indications you may have trigger points on your Vastus medialis are:

    • Pain/weakness in the thigh
    • Giving way of the knee
    • Pain on knee extension – straightening out of the knee

    List of things to do when finding trigger points in the quadriceps:

    1. Review the area
    2. Identify trigger point by pressing on the area and seeing if it causes any referred pain
    3. Stroke down the muscle lightly to warm up the tissues
    4. Find the trigger point once again and add pressure until the referred pain reduces
    5. Massage muscle again to flush it through

    When working on this trigger point you can use a thera-cane, or a foam roller.

    The vastus lateralis

    The vastus lateralis is found on the outer portion of the thigh and is actually a large portion of the quadriceps (refer to the diagram below). This muscle runs under a thick band on the side of your leg called your Illiotibial band (ITB). Running over the top of this band creates more compression and can be quite painful, so make sure to take care when rolling over this.

    The vastus lateralis is responsible along with the rest of the quadricep group for the the straightening of the knee.


    The “X” on the picture above, marks where the knots are and the red area is the possible referral pain. Bear in mind that the points shown are not an exact area of trigger points and trigger point areas can vary, which is why it is best to do your own feel of the muscle before you begin. The indicator of a trigger point is a deep dull pain.

    As you can see there are a lot of potential trigger points on the vastus lateralis, this is because it is in constant use, unlike the other thigh muscles.  This means that the lateralis tends to pick up a lot of slack for the other thigh muscles, which causes an uptake of more knots.

    Causes of trigger points arrival: hamstring weakness or injury, ports overload without proper technique, poor foot and ankle biomechanics.

    Other indications you may have trigger points on your vastus medialis

    • Pain/weakness in the thigh
    • Giving way of the knee
    • Pain on knee extension – straightening out of the knee

    List of things to do when finding trigger points in the quadriceps

    1. Review the area
    2. Identify trigger point by pressing on the area and seeing if it causes any referred pain.
    3. Stroke down the muscle lightly to warm up the tissues
    4. Find the trigger point once again and add pressure until the referred pain reduces
    5. Massage muscle again to flush it through

    For videos on how to improve the health of your back hips and knees you can go to my YouTube channel. Subscribe here. https://www.youtube.com/channe..


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